Graduate School

Keisen Graduate School

In every part of the world, there are a number of people who are marginalized and forced to live in socially and environmentally difficult life conditions. The causes of this global problem could be attributed to the increase of direct violence and armed conflict accelerated by military proliferation, and the persistence of structural violence widening the economic gap between rich and poor, increasing discrimination and human rights abuse, and degrading the natural environment. Furthermore, they are direct or indirect consequences resulting genealogically from the history of colonialism and linked to our social structure emphasizing differentiating factors in religion and culture. For our human kind to live peacefully in this world, it is necessary to educate and train more students who should have extensive knowledge about global issues in the world with multi-cultural perspectives, and actively engage themselves in solving problems with practical methodologies.
Keisen Graduate School was established in 2001 at the dawn of the new millennium, with its Division of International Socio-cultural Studies focusing on two main educational principles: Multicultural Coexistence and International Coexistence. After extensive restructuring, it now consists of a Graduate School of Humanities, Division of Cultural Coexistence, and a Graduate School of Human and Social Studies, Division of Peace Studies. In 2007, Keisen Graduate Schools launched new programs to educate and train students who can devote themselves to multicultural coexistence and global peace. Each division has unique programs as follows:

Division of Cultural Coexistence:

This division is designed to educate and train multicultural communication experts in two main fields: Japanese-Language education and multicultural coexistence studies. Students choose classes covering issues such as Japanese language teaching and education theories, gender and culture studies, minority and culture studies and multicultural communication to widen and deepen their knowledge about cultural vulnerability and diversity to bring about multicultural coexistence.

Division of Peace Studies:

This division is a pioneer in advanced and practical studies in global peacebuilding. Students choose classes covering subjects facing the present global and national societies such as North-South issues, International Cooperation, racial and religious conflicts, low birth rates and ageing, and gender issues. English or other foreign language study, and Field Study courses, prepare students for their fieldwork within Japan and overseas.

Curriculum

Division of Cultural Coexistence

Basic Research Area (required elective)

First-year students must earn 4 credits from this Research Area (every course in this graduate school counts as 2 credits). Study of Japanese Language Education I; Study of Japanese Language Education II: AKIMOTO Miharu, YAMADA Masahiro, Study of Cultural Exchange I ; Study of Cultural Exchange II: ENOMOTO Mariko, TAKEDA Toru

Specialized Research Area (required elective)

Student must earn at least 12 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years. Japanese LanguageⅠ: TAKAMI Kenichi
Japanese LanguageⅡ: SUZUKI Hiroshi
Japanese LanguageⅢ: MARUYAMA Takehiko
Japanese Language Education I: ARUGA Chikako
Japanese Language Education II: Ono Masaki
Japanese Culture: UMEZAWA Fumiko
Japanese Literature I: SAYA Makito
Japanese Literature II: SHINOZAKI Mioko
Japanese Literature III: OZAWA Jun
Japanese Teaching Practice: AKIMOTO Miharu
Cultural Exchanges I: ENOMOTO Mariko
Cultural Exchanges II: TAKEDA Toru
Religious Culture: SASAO Michiyo
Gender Culture: INAMOTO Mariko
Minority Culture: I Son Jon
Study of Cultural Exchange Issues

Related Research Area (required elective)

Students must earn at least 6 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years. Linguistic Culture: NAGASE Yoshiki
Second Language Acquisition: NAGASAKA Akemi
Study of Historical Regional Culture: TAKAHAMA Toshiyuki
Study of Historical Regional Society: SUGIYAMA Keiko
Practical English: Dexter DA SILVA

Research Seminar Area (required)

Students must earn 8 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years. Special Study of Cultural Cooperation: AKIMOTO Miharu, YAMADA Masahiro, ENOMOTO Mariko, TAKEDA Toru, SAYA Makito, SHINOZAKI Mioko, SASAO Michiyo, INAMOTO Mariko, I Son Jon, TAKAHAMA Toshiyuki, SUGIYAMA Keiko

Division of Peace Studies:

Basic Research Area (required elective)

First-year students must earn 4 credits from this Research Area (every course in this graduate school counts as 2 credits).

Peace Study I ; Peace Study II:UEMURA Hideaki (Study of Indigenous Peoples; Study of International Human Rights Law),SAWANOBORI Sanae,SADAMATSU Aya,OHINATA Masami

Specialized Research Area (required elective)

Students must earn at least 10 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years.

Peacebuilding: TAKAHASHI Kiyotaka (Study of Peacebuilding; Study of Social Movements)
Global Governance: KAWASAKI Akira (Study of Nuclear Disarmament)
Multiethnic Cooperation:Miyamoto Masaaki
NGO Studies: OHASHI Masaaki
Public Welfare Studies: TAKAHASHI Kiyotaka
International Agricultural Studies: SAWANOBORI Sanae (Horticulture)
Gender Studies: OHINATA Masami (Developmental Psychology; Gender Studies)
International and Transnational Society: SADAMATSU Aya (Transnational Sociology; Study of Regional Culture in Europe)
Environment and Society:KITOH Shuichi
Religion and Peace: KAWASHIMA Kenji (Christian Studies; Study of Religion)

Area Studies Research Area (required elective)

Students must earn at least 2 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years.

Study of South East Asia:MASE Tomoko
Study of East Asia:LEE Young Chae
Study of South Asia: OHASHI Masaaki

Related Research Area (required elective)

Students must earn at least 6 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years.

Practical Study of Peace I: KITOH Shuichi
Practical Study of Peace II:Sung Konghoe University
Research Method I: HARAGUCHI Takako (International Cooperation, Project Evaluation)
Research Method II:
Study of Practical English: Dexter DA SILVA (Educational Psychology)
Field Study I
Field Study II

Research Seminar Area (required)

Students must earn 8 credits from this Research Area during their first and second academic years.

Special Study of Peace: UEMURA Hideaki; OHASHI Masaaki; OHINATA Masami; NIIZUMA Akio; KAWASHIMA Kenji ;SAWANOBORI Sanae;SADAMATSU Aya;Dexter DA SILVA;LEE Young Chae;TAKAHASHI Kiyotaka

Outline of Syllabus

Peacebuilding: TAKAHASHI Kiyotaka

Violent conflicts at the present time occur mainly in developing countries with the potentiality of recurrence. This course aims to analyze such unique features of current conflicts and examine the roles of the international community and various peacebuilding policies regarding the security sector reform and reconstruction development.

Religion and Peace: KAWASHIMA Kenji

This course aims to interpret Immanuel Kant's classical philosophical essay on peace entitled "Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch," examining such topics as the historical backgrounds in which he lived and his view on ethics and religion. It also analyzes the influence of his thought upon the following generations, particularly in Article 9 of the Peace Constitution of Japan.

NGO Studies: OHASHI Masaaki

In the midst of the growing interest in NGOs and NPOs, are they actually becoming the social forces in the civil society that are able to overcome both the retreating roles of states and the limitations of markets? This course analyzes the current state of NGOs and NPOs, sorting out the concepts and the legal frameworks including the taxation system concerning those organizations. It also examines the history of Asian NGOs and the challenges they face, in particular the current and desirable roles that Japanese NGOs play in addressing global agendas.

Public Welfare Studies: TAKAHASHI Kiyotaka

A large amount of expenditure of Official Development Assistance has been spent in order to reduce the poverty of developing countries. While some countries have succeeded in "taking-off", others such as Sub-Saharan African countries are suffering from increasing poverty and a widening income gap in spite of all that aid. Meanwhile, new approaches to develop human resources and the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals have been tried in order to address this situation. This course re-examines such current and previous efforts at development in developing countries to explore appropriate development approaches from a practical perspective.

Gender Studies: OHINATA Masami

This course takes the decline of the birth rate in Japan as the gateway to examine gender issues. This includes the analysis of the policies of the Japanese government to address the declining birth rate, international comparisons of those governmental efforts including policies toward the family, and the examination of such topics as views on the family and women, and the employment system in Japanese society.

Peace Study Ⅰ: UEMURA Hideaki

The unique perspectives of "Peace Study" in this graduate school are a) the embracing of a nonviolence principle, b) the focus on structural violence, c) a standpoint of the least advantaged, and d) the emphasis on historical understanding. From these perspectives, this course analyzes basic topics and concepts including International Human Rights Law and International Humanitarian Law, socialism and Democratic Peace Theory, nuclear weapons and security, Rights-based Approach, global environmental issues and environmental pollution, and indigenous peoples and decolonization.

Relation to Faculty

Relation to Faculty
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